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Social capital and local development: from theory to empirics

The book “Social capital and local development: from theory to empirics” has been published by Palgrave Macmillan (Springer Nature) and is available for purchase here.

SIMRA project coordinator Prof. Maria Nijnik and project partner Bill Slee wrote the Foreword; and SIMRA results were directly used in the following chapters: Chapter 5 “Social capital, network governance and social innovation: towards a new paradigm” (83-105) and Chapter 19 “What future of LEADER as a catalyst of social innovation” (417-438), while also contributing to other chapters.

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Adopt your cow and encourage mountain farming

“Adotta una mucca”, (“Adopt a cow” in English) is an Italian initiative from the Valsugana Valley in the Trentino province. Its objective is to introduce tourists, children and families to mountain life and culture. Adopters can visit various Alpine huts, learn how mountain products are made faithfully following old recipes and enjoy cows on mountain pastures.

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Still wondering what social innovation in rural areas looks like? Check out our new brochure!

Cet article est disponible en français ici.

This new SIMRA brochure aims at showcasing the diversity of social innovations in rural areas of Europe and the Mediterranean regions. A sneak peek of what you will find in this brochure includes revitalisation plans of a UNESCO site in Slovakia, a renewable energy community trust in the UK, sustainable fishers delivering boxes of seafood to your doorstep in Greece, or a public-private partnership to support dairy producers in Tunisia!

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When preserving the wool means preserving the territory

This article is available in Spanish here.// Este artículo está disponible en español aquí.

Extensive livestock farming is the most important population-fixing activity in Iberian rural areas. This is so because, unlike other activities, it requires people to take care of the animals every day. Furthermore, in many marginal rural areas, extensive livestock farming is often the only possibility that the territory has to offer.

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